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Textus Receptus Bibles

Geneva Bible 1560

 

   

2:1After a fewe dayes, hee entred into Capernaum againe, and it was noysed that he was in the house.
2:2And anon, many gathered together, in so much that the places about the doore coulde not receiue any more and he preached the word vnto them.
2:3And there came vnto him, that brought one sicke of the palsie, borne of foure men.
2:4And because they could not come neere vnto him for the multitude, they vncouered ye roofe of the house where hee was: and when they had broken it open, they let downe the bed, wherein the sicke of the palsie lay.
2:5Nowe when Iesus sawe their faith, he saide to the sicke of the palsie, Sonne, thy sinnes are forgiuen thee.
2:6And there were certaine of the Scribes sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts,
2:7Why doeth this man speake such blasphemies? who can forgiue sinnes, but God onely?
2:8And immediatly when Iesus perceiued in his spirite, that thus they reasoned with themselues, he sayde vnto them, Why reason yee these things in your hearts?
2:9Whether is it easier to say to the sicke of the palsie, Thy sinnes are forgiuen thee? or to say, Arise, and take vp thy bed, and walke?
2:10But that ye may knowe, that the Sonne of man hath authoritie in earth to forgiue sinnes, (he sayde vnto the sicke of the palsie.)
2:11I say vnto thee, Arise and take vp thy bed, and get thee hence into thine owne house.
2:12And by and by he arose, and tooke vp his bed, and went foorth before them all, in so much that they were all amased, and glorified God, saying, We neuer sawe such a thing.
2:13Then he went foorth againe towarde the sea, and all the people resorted vnto him, and he taught them.
2:14And as Iesus passed by, hee sawe Leui the sonne of Alpheus sit at the receit of custome, and said vnto him, Folowe me. And he arose and followed him.
2:15And it came to passe, as Iesus sate at table in his house, many Publicanes and sinners sate at table also with Iesus, and his disciples: for there were many that followed him.
2:16And when the Scribes and Pharises sawe him eate with the Publicanes and sinners, they sayd vnto his disciples, Howe is it, that hee eateth and drinketh with Publicanes and sinners?
2:17Now when Iesus heard it, hee sayde vnto them, The whole haue no neede of the Physicion, but the sicke. I came not to call the righteous, but the sinners to repentance.
2:18And the disciples of Iohn, and the Pharises did fast, and came and saide vnto him, Why doe the disciples of Iohn, and of the Pharises fast, and thy disciples fast not?
2:19And Iesus saide vnto them, Can the children of the marriage chamber fast, whiles the bridegrome is with them? as long as they haue the bridegrome with them, they cannot fast.
2:20But the daies will come, when the bridegrome shall be taken from them, and then shall they fast in those daies.
2:21Also no man soweth a piece of newe cloth in an olde garment: for els the newe piece that filled it vp, taketh away somewhat from the olde, and the breach is worse.
2:22Likewise, no man putteth newe wine into old vessels: for els the new wine breaketh the vessels, and the wine runneth out, and the vessels are lost: but newe wine must be put into new vessels.
2:23And it came to passe as hee went through the corne on the Sabbath day, that his disciples, as they went on their way, began to plucke the eares of corne.
2:24And the Pharises saide vnto him, Beholde, why doe they on the Sabbath day, that which is not lawfull?
2:25And he saide to them, Haue yee neuer read what Dauid did when he had neede, and was an hungred, both he, and they that were with him?
2:26Howe he went into the house of God, in the daies of Abiathar the hie Priest, and did eat the shewe bread, which were not lawfull to eate, but for the Priests, and gaue also to them which were with him?
2:27And hee sayde to them, The Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the Sabbath.
2:28Wherefore the Sonne of man is Lord, euen of the Sabbath.
Geneva Bible 1560

Geneva Bible 1560

The Geneva Bible is one of the most influential and historically significant translations of the Bible into English, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of 16th century Protestantism and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan. The language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous and because of this, most readers strongly preferred this version at the time.

The Geneva Bible was produced by a group of English scholars who, fleeing from the reign of Queen Mary, had found refuge in Switzerland. During the reign of Queen Mary, no Bibles were printed in England, the English Bible was no longer used in churches and English Bibles already in churches were removed and burned. Mary was determined to return Britain to Roman Catholicism.

The first English Protestant to die during Mary's turbulent reign was John Rogers in 1555, who had been the editor of the Matthews Bible. At this time, hundreds of Protestants left England and headed for Geneva, a city which under the leadership of Calvin, had become the intellectual and spiritual capital of European Protestants.

One of these exiles was William Whittingham, a fellow of Christ Church at Oxford University, who had been a diplomat, a courtier, was much traveled and skilled in many languages including Greek and Hebrew. He eventually succeeded John Knox as the minister of the English congregation in Geneva. Whittingham went on to publish the 1560 Geneva Bible.

This version is significant because, it came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids, which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indices, as well as other included features, all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study Bible.